Jamal Khashoggi: Liam Fox given STARK warning over Saudi Arabia amid ‘BONE SAW’ murder

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Posted on Oct 19 2018 - 4:11pm by admin

Mr Khashoggi disappeared on October 2 when he was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.

It is believed Mr Khashoggi was murdered by the Saudis and then brutally dismembered as his body was hacked into pieces using a so-called “bone saw”.

The former International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell has insisted International Trade minister Liam Fox should not attend a conference in a country that has been complicit in “quite extraordinary events that have breached international humanitarian law”.

Mr Mitchell told Express.co.uk: “It would be inconceivable as matters stand today that a British minister could visit and take part in a Saudi Arabian trade festival.”

The Conservative MP’s comments pile pressure on Mr Fox to join a growing list of global companies already pulling out of the Saudi Arabian event, which is being dubbed “Davos in the Desert”.

The chief executives of HSBC, Credit Suisse and the London Stock Exchange have said they will not attend.

But the UK’s biggest events company, BAE Systems, has said it will be sending representatives while Mr Fox is yet to make a decision, as the world reels from the news of Mr Khashoggi’s barbarous murder.

Of the bloodthirsty crime, Mr Mitchell said: “Britain is rightly close to Saudi Arabia – a country where we have deep historic links as well as security and economic interests.

“But whoever authorised and took part in this horrific murder must be held to account.”

He continued: “If we fail to speak out without fear or favour about what has happened – especially after Salisbury – we would leave Britain accused of hypocrisy of a very high order indeed.”

Mr Mitchell’s suggestion Saudi Arabia should be held accountable for the killing of Mr Khashoggi has been echoed by a number of prominent Saudi dissidents and commentators as they urge the world to employ a critical view on the Middle Eastern Kingdom.

Saudi dissident Ali al-Ahmed was incarcerated in Saudi Arabia when he was 14 years old, making him the youngest political prisoner at that time.

He told Express.co.uk: “This really is the true nature of the Saudi monarchy – it has has been able to hide and cover up this atrocity with the help of its western backers.

“This is the picture – the ISIS-style killing of a man who was their servant, to be honest – he was their mouthpiece for many years.

“He veered away from them and they decided to send a message and commit what was essentially a public execution.”

Mr al-Ahmed, who claimed the Saudi monarchy had “destroyed” his native country, explained there was no religious requirement to “kill people in the city square” but “they still continue to do it”.

He said: “The goal is to use these killings in a political manner to scare the population and subject them to the rule of this monarchy.”

Saudi satirist and political activist Ghanem al-Dosari – who is living in self-imposed exile in the UK – has also added his voice to the censure.

The YouTube star argued the image of Mohammed bin Salman “the reformer” was an erroneous and skewed version of the barbaric ruler propagated by a well-oiled PR machine.

He told Express.co.uk: “Mohammad bin Salman has spent a very large amount of money in order to present this image to the West that he is a reformer – but in reality, he is not a reformer – he is a dictator.”

Mr al-Dosari was brutally assaulted near Harrods in Knightsbridge in broad daylight in September.

His attackers screamed Mohammad bin Salman’s name as they approached him before punching him in the face and dragging him along Brompton Road.

In an unambiguous comparison, the human rights activist – who is known for his social media presence and acerbic YouTube videos ridiculing the Saudi royals – said: “There is no difference between the Saudi government and ISIS.”

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