European election SHOCK: Green Party STORMS Dublin exit polls in WARNING to Varadkar party

Posted on May 26 2019 - 3:04am by admin

The support has been widespread across the Republic of Ireland which also accounts for a four percent margin of error. The unexpected results could see a boost in Ireland’s two other constituencies, according to RTE. The Dublin constituency is projected to see a poll-toppling performance from the Green Party’s former junior minister Ciaran Cuffe with a suggested 23 percent first preference vote.

The poll suggests that Sean Kelly from Ireland’s largest party Fine Gael could be re-elected with voters in the South constituency supporting him by 16 percent.

However, Fine Gael’s Mairead McGuiness is likely to top the poll in the Midlands/North West constituency, the research suggests.

The national public service media of Ireland commissioned the RedC exit poll and spoke to 3,230 voters in stations across Ireland.

The nation has 13 European Parliament seats.

READ MORE: European elections 2019 results: Which countries are left to vote?

It comes as Ireland’s Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar warned that Theresa May’s decision to step down as Prime Minister puts his country in “danger”.

He fears that Mrs May could be replaced by a hard Brexiteer like Boris Johnson who has said to “prepare for no deal”.

Mr Varadkar told Ireland’s Virgin Media News: ”We may see the election of a Eurosceptic prime minister who wants to repudiate the withdrawal agreement and go for no deal or we may even see a new British government that wants to see a closer relationship with the EU and goes for a second referendum.

“But whatever happens we are going to hold our nerve.

“We are going to strengthen and build our alliances across the European Union and we will make sure that we see Ireland through this.”

Meanwhile, SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon has said Mrs May’s decision to quit will not solve the question of Brexit.

Mrs May announced her decision to resign as leader of the Tories on Friday morning saying she will step down on June 7.

She insisted during her speech on Friday morning that she had “done her best” but also admitted it had not been good enough.

During the statement in which she was close to tears, with husband Philip looking on, she said: “It is and will always remain a matter of deep regret to me that I have not been able to deliver Brexit.”

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