Brexit EXPLAINED: What has changed – and what is happening with Brexit NOW?

Posted on Mar 3 2019 - 10:59pm by admin

There are less than four weeks to go until Britain’s exit from the European Union (EU) but Theresa May’s divisive Brexit plan looks wobblier than ever. MPs have backed important concessions that could make a difference to what happens next. One of the most important votes decided on Wednesday was the Brexit timetable, which could now be delayed. Right now, the UK is supposed to exit the EU on March 29.

This means the Prime Minister will bring the Brexit deal back to the Commons for another “meaningful vote” by March 12 at the latest.

By then, Mrs May will be hoping she has secured the necessary changes from EU leaders on the Northern Ireland backstop to get her vote through on March 13.

But if this does not happen, then MPs will to have the power to demand Mrs May calls for an extension to Article 50.

If they agree to a “short, limited extension” – and this is not certain – then Mrs May will still need to get approval from all 27 EU states.

READ MORE: BREXIT SECOND REFERENDUM: WHY JEREMY CORBYN MADE SHOCKING U-TURN ON PEOPLE’S VOTE REVEALED

Not everyone was happy with the vote’s result and George Eustice quit as environment minister in protest at a possible extension.

More than 100 Tory MPs also openly revolted by abstaining from the vote, despite a Government three-line whip.

An SNP and Plaid Cymru-tabled amendment to prevent a no-deal Brexit, even if article 50 is extended was defeated by 324 to 288 votes.

So that means a no-deal Brexit is still a future possibility.

READ MORE: LABOUR’S BREXIT BETRAYAL: CORBYN TO SUPPORT SECOND EU REFERENDUM AND BACK REMAIN

What about Labour?

Jeremy Corbyn faced defeat in the Commons in a separate vote after his alternative Brexit plan was defeated.

Labour had proposed keeping the UK in the customs unions after Brexit, but this was voted down by 323 votes to 240 votes.

Following the result, Mr Corbyn said Labour would now back another EU referendum.

But the Labour leader refuses to rule out “other available options” such as a general election.

Was there anything else?

The protection of EU citizens’ rights were formally protected after MPs approval, although the amendment did not go to a vote.

What happens now?

Mrs May will go back to Brussels to secure the changes she needs before the crucial vote on March 13.

The Prime Minister opposes a Brexit extension and warned it does not prevent a no-deal Brexit further down the line but could create a “much sharper cliff edge” instead.

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